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Statement from the National Security and Intelligence Review Agency about Foreign Interference

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Message

The National Security and Intelligence Review Agency (NSIRA) is currently reviewing certain Canadian  Security Intelligence Service (CSIS) activities in relation to foreign interference, especially the risk framework used for these activities. Building on current reviews, NSIRA will review the process by which intelligence related to foreign interference was assessed by the security and intelligence community prior to, and following, the 43rd and 44th federal general elections, including how various assessment products were shared and escalated to relevant decision-makers. As provided for in the NSIRA Act, NSIRA will take all reasonable steps to cooperate with the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians (NSICOP) to avoid duplication of work in relation to the fulfilment of our respective mandates.

NSIRA values transparency and implements best practices to share as much information as possible through its review reports. NSIRA considers independence as the most fundamental value at the core of its mandate. As with all its reviews and investigations, NSIRA will carry out this work with resolute commitment to independence and impartiality.

For more information, please contact:

National Security and Intelligence Review Agency

MEDIA-MEDIAS@nsira-ossnr.gc.ca

@NSIRACanada

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Joint Review of SCIDA Disclosures finds General Compliance but some Areas of Concern

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News release

OTTAWA, February 22, 2022 – A review of information sharing related to national security under the Security of Canada Disclosure Act (SCIDA) has found the vast majority of disclosures by federal organizations to be in compliance with the requirements of the Act. There were, however, a few cases that raised significant concerns, particularly one disclosure by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) that involved the personal information of thousands of people.

This was the first-ever joint review by the National Security and Intelligence Review Agency (NSIRA) and the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada (OPC).

The joint report on disclosures under SCIDA has been tabled in Parliament. NSIRA earlier carried out a review of 2019 disclosures.

Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS) and the Communications Security Establishment were the primary recipients of information under SCIDA in 2020. The RCMP was also one of the top recipients of information and made a number of disclosures itself.

The primary disclosers of information included Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada, which was responsible for 159 disclosures, or approximately 74% of all disclosures in 2020, many of which related to information contained in passport applications, primarily confirming citizenship status or to provide biographical information.

Global Affairs Canada was responsible for 40 disclosures (approximately 19%), many of which contained information gathered by diplomatic missions regarding the movements of individuals in foreign countries.

The review found that 212 of 215 disclosures of information in 2020 met the requirements of a disclosure test set out under SCIDA.

The review found that most of the disclosures involved one or a few individuals. A handful involved larger numbers of people, including one of particular concern, which accounted for the vast majority of individuals affected by SCIDA disclosures in 2020.

In that case, the RCMP disclosed to the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces the biometric information of thousands of men, women and children detained by a foreign entity on suspicion of being members or supporters of a terrorist organization.

The review raised concerns about that instance because it involved the RCMP disclosing highly sensitive information based on incomplete data. The missing information would have been necessary to properly assess both the effect on privacy interests and the reasonable necessity of the disclosure, as required by SCIDA.

Following their review, NSIRA and the OPC made 11 recommendations aimed at improving compliance with SCIDA. These related to, for example, record keeping, governance and measures to ensure SCIDA’s disclosure test is met.

NSIRA and the OPC are calling on institutions to implement the recommendations within six months.

For more information, please contact:

National Security and Intelligence Review Agency

MEDIA-MEDIAS@nsira-ossnr.gc.ca

@NSIRACanada

Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada
Communications@priv.gc.ca

@PrivacyPrivee

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National Security and Intelligence Review – Agency Letter on Implementation of the Call to Action on Anti-Racism, Equity and Inclusion

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National Security and Intelligence Review – Agency Letter on Implementation of the Call to Action on Anti-Racism, Equity and Inclusion


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Message

Dear Ms. Charette:

I am writing in response to your correspondence of June 28, 2021, in which you requested that deputy heads across the public service provide you with open letters outlining steps taken in response to the Call to Action on Anti-Racism, Equity and Inclusion in the Federal Public Service, which was issued on January 22, 2021.

As a new organization, established in July 2019, the National Security and Intelligence Review Agency (NSIRA) has taken a number of steps to incorporate anti-racism, equity and inclusion into systems and practices, across all of our business lines. As your guidance letter recognized, organizations in the federal public service are at different stages of implementation. While NSIRA has made a lot of progress, we recognize that as a new organization we still have much work to do to advance the goals outlined in the Call to Action.

Below is a summary of progress made to date in implementing the Call to Action, including a description of successes and ongoing challenges. My hope is that it contributes meaningfully to a shared body of knowledge and practices across the federal public service, and that other organizations are able to benefit from understanding NSIRA’s work to-date on these issues. Likewise, I look forward to learning about the successes and challenges of other organizations in implementing the Call to Action, and to incorporating best practices as we continue to advance on issues of anti-racism, equity and inclusion.

Yours sincerely,

John Davies
Executive Director
National Security and Intelligence Review Agency Secretariat

Corporate Services and Human Resources

Successes

  • 2020-2021 was NSIRA’s first full year in operation. During that time, the NSIRA Secretariat put its human resources infrastructure in place, including introducing policies with respect to staffing and recruitment, learning and development, performance and talent management, employment equity, duty to accommodate and flexible work arrangements, among others. The timing was such that the Secretariat was able to take a deliberate, thoughtful approach to issues such as anti-racism, discrimination, equity and inclusion, and to pay careful attention to existing or potential systemic barriers as it developed its policy suite and terms and conditions of employment.
  • Although the NSIRA Secretariat is not subject to the Treasury Board Policy on People Management, it nevertheless designated a senior official for employment equity, diversity and inclusion (EE, D&I).
  • The NSIRA Secretariat developed a maturity model to assess its current situation with respect to anti-racism, anti-discrimination, accessibility, employment equity, diversity and inclusion.  The maturity model will be used to evaluate progress and the extent to which various initiatives are helping to achieve the desired outcomes.
  • The Secretariat adopted a name-blind approach for appointments to management and executive positions. This was in an effort to mitigate against potential bias in selection processes.
  • The NSIRA Secretariat deliberately advertised job opportunities to a wide candidate pool, including both within and outside the public service, in Canada and abroad.  This attracted a number of individuals who self-identified as members of an employment equity designated group.
  • NSIRA Secretariat has only six (6) executive positions, two of which are classified in the Law Manager (LC) group. Since April 1, 2020, five positions were staffed, of which 60% of the appointees self-identified as a member of an employment equity designated group. As well, four management positions (e.g. EC-07, FI-04, etc.) were staffed in 2020-2021, all with members of an employment equity designated group.

Challenges

  • As a separate agency of fewer than 100 FTES, the NSIRA Secretariat is not required to gather self-ID data. Despite this, the Secretariat explored with Treasury Board Secretariat (TBS) the possibility of using their self-ID tool and system. Unfortunately, TBS advised that this was not possible because of legal considerations. NSIRA has nevertheless been closely following TBS’ work on redesigning the self-ID tool and is planning to introduce its own self-ID tool to measure representation in 2021-2022.  In the meantime, the Secretariat is relying on PSES data to provide a baseline with respect to both representation and the workplace experience.

Being a micro-agency outside the core public administration is perhaps the most significant challenge. The Call to Action calls on public service leaders to appoint, sponsor and support Indigenous employees and Black and other racialized employees, through the use of talent management, leadership develop and career development programs and services. Micro-agencies neither have the same resources, nor access to the same infrastructure as departments and agencies in the core public administration including job opportunities, inclusion in system-wide talent management exercises, or the programs, tools or systems developed and led by the Office of the Chief Human Resources Officer (OCHRO) at TBS.

Creating an Environment for Dialogue on Anti-Racism and Social Justice

Successes

  • In its first year, NSIRA Secretariat put the emphasis on developing inclusive leadership skills and in establishing a sense of belonging and trust, for example, through education and learning events, discussions aimed at increasing awareness, understanding and the link to reviews and investigations.
  • With the support of staff volunteers, NSIRA’s Champion for Employment Equity, Diversity and Inclusion led numerous all-staff discussions on themes related to anti-racism, diversity and inclusion, including: the impact of the murder of George Floyd, the conviction of Derek Chauvin, in which staff had the opportunity to discuss the trial, and unconscious bias.  Staff also watched a number of documentaries about residential school survivors, which served as a platform for an educational discussion. In addition, all-staff events were held to mark Black History Month, International Women’s Day, Asian Heritage Month and National Indigenous History Month.
  • The impact of these all-staff discussions are borne out in the Public Service Employee Survey data, which found that:
    • 68% of NSIRA respondents would feel free to speak about racism in the workplace without fear of reprisal (public service average is 48%);
    • 87% of NSIRA respondents agree or strongly agree that their agency implements initiatives that promote anti-racism in the workplace (public service average is 75%);
    • 85% of NSIRA respondents agree or strongly agree that they would feel comfortable sharing concerns about issues related to racism in the workplace with a person of authority (public service average is 79%).

Priorities

  • An important priority in the year ahead will be to continue to create an environment in which all employees feel comfortable participating in discussions on issues related to anti-racism, diversity and inclusion. Seeking input and participation through different means can help to reach people who shy away from larger conversations.
  • Another key challenge will be to continue to promote an environment of open and inclusive dialogue, while leveraging staff engagement to create a well-defined work plan for the year ahead.

Outreach and Stakeholder Engagement

Successes

  • NSIRA has broadened its stakeholder network over the past year, to include a more diverse range of perspectives that can help to improve how we undertake our core business of reviews and complaint investigations. Some of this engagement looked at the intersection of race and national security, and the positive role that NSIRA can play in promoting equity through its review program.
  • NSIRA undertook a consultation on the reform of its complaint investigation process, with the goal of ensuring efficiency and transparency of its investigations, which often involve complainants from racialized groups.

Challenges

  • Demystifying the complaint process and informing a broad cross-section of society of its availability.
  • Making materials available in languages beyond English and French, so that linguistic minorities and members of ethnic groups who perceive themselves as having been unfairly targeted by security services can make use of the complaint mechanism.

Reviews and Complaint Investigations

Successes

  • NSIRA has initiated work on a trend analysis for complaints, which will involve a broad initiative to appropriately collect race-based and other demographic information. The objectives of this initiative are to improve access to justice by improving awareness and understanding of the investigation process. The overall aim is to document the different racial groups among civilian complainants and determine whether there are significant racial disparities; whether there are racial differences with respect to the types of complaints made against national security agency members based on different groups; the frequency of complaints that include allegations of racial or other forms of bias; whether complaint investigation outcomes vary by racial group; and whether civilian satisfaction with NSIRA’s investigation process varies by racial group.
  • NSIRA’s program of planned and ongoing reviews also takes into account the potential for national security and intelligence activities to result in disparate outcomes for visible minority groups. Ongoing reviews of the Canada Border Services Agency’s targeting practices, as well as the use of biometrics in the national security and intelligence context, focus specifically on understanding the impacts of these activities on diverse communities.

Challenges

  • How to better integrate Gender-Based Analysis Plus (GBA+) into NSIRA’s review methodology.

For more information, please contact:

National Security and Intelligence Review Agency

MEDIA-MEDIAS@nsira-ossnr.gc.ca

@NSIRACanada

Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada
Communications@priv.gc.ca

@PrivacyPrivee

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Message from the Chair

Table of Contents

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Message

It is an honour to be appointed Chair of the National Security and Intelligence Review Agency (NSIRA).

As Chair, my priorities are to support NSIRA’s objectivity and independence in its review mandate, with a focus on the “trust but verify” principle, and, for its investigative mandate, to enhance access to justice, particularly through the new process put in place in July 2021 (see new process here).

In addition, I will continue to build the trust that Canadians have towards their system of national security and intelligence review and to strengthen NSIRA’s relationships with the departments and agencies that fall under its review mandate. At the same time, I will underscore NSIRA’s commitment to collaborate with other review bodies, its engagement with community stakeholders, and will work to increase transparency and accountability for national security and intelligence activities in Canada.

I am grateful for the support that I receive from NSIRA’s specialized and diversified team and I look forward to continuing to work with my NSIRA colleagues to build on NSIRA’s accomplishments in the years ahead.

The Honourable Marie Deschamps, C.C.

Chair, National Security and Intelligence Review Agency

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The Prime Minister announces member of the National Security and Intelligence Review Agency

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The Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau, today announced the following appointment:

The Honourable Marie Deschamps, C.C. becomes a member of the National Security and Intelligence Review Agency (NSIRA), effective September 30, 2019.

With full and independent authority, the NSIRA works to ensure that Canada’s national security agencies are complying with the law and that their actions are reasonable and necessary.

Biographical Notes

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NSIRA’s update concerning the recent cyber event – continuing notification of affected individuals

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The National Security and Intelligence Review Agency (NSIRA) experienced a cyber security breach this past spring linked to the exploitation of Microsoft Exchange vulnerabilities. Between March 9 and March 19, 2021, a third party gained sporadic, unauthorized access to NSIRA’s externally-facing network (the “Protected B” network). The information below provides potentially affected individuals with more information about the breach.

The incident did not affect NSIRA’s classified systems.

What information was compromised?

The compromise resulted in the theft of two files: the first, a file containing system and software configuration settings for one of NSIRA’s servers, and the second comprising NSIRA’s active directory database. NSIRA’s active directory database contained basic information on NSIRA’s network users to facilitate their connection to the IT network. This information generally consisted of an individual’s first and last name, their office and/or personal phone numbers, and their NSIRA email addresses, as well as a hash of current and previously used passwords. Individuals affected by the theft of the active directory database have been directly notified by NSIRA, with a few exceptions. If you are a former employee, contractor or Member who has not heard from us, please contact NSIRA at privacy-vieprivee@nsira-ossnr.gc.ca for further information. The active directory database did not contain information about employees of other Government of Canada agencies nor about members of the public.

Did the third party access other information on the Protected B network?

The Canadian Centre for Cyber Security (the “Cyber Centre”) examined NSIRA’s IT infrastructure following the cyber security incident and found no evidence suggesting that the threat actor improperly accessed, or exfiltrated, other information stored on NSIRA’s Protected B network. We cannot fully exclude the possibility, however, that the threat actor may have improperly accessed other information stored on the Protected B network.

What types of personal information are found on NSIRA’s Protected B Network?

NSIRA’s Protected B network hosts a variety of unclassified, Protected A and Protected B documents created by our corporate, review and legal directorates. In addition, the network contained a variety of personal information related to both NSIRA employees and other individuals. The Protected B network also held NSIRA’s email server, which included both encrypted and unencrypted communications.

NSIRA has discussed the contents of its Protected B network with its employees and familiarized them with the type of personal information stored in their regard on NSIRA’s servers. In addition, the Protected B server would have included the following types of personal information on the listed groups:

  • Employees of Government of Canada departments and agencies, with whom NSIRA engages in its review, complaint or corporate mandates, particularly their email addresses, signature blocks and the content of email exchanges;
  • Information provided by individuals when submitting complaints for investigation by NSIRA, including a summary of their allegations;
  • Recent job or contract applicants, whose c.v. and attendant personal information (e.g. work history, residential address and contact information) remained on file;
  • On rare occasions, individuals referenced in security clearance forms submitted by employees or job applicants, such as family members and character references, if saved locally by employees on the network or if temporarily retained by NSIRA on the network at the time of the breach;
  • Individuals in academic and civil society groups engaged by NSIRA’s outreach efforts, namely their contact information and the contents of e-mail correspondence, and
  • Similarly, members of the public, including ATIP requestors, media representatives, and other individuals who have emailed NSIRA.

How did NSIRA respond to the breach?

Upon discovery of the compromise in March, NSIRA worked closely with Shared Services Canada (SSC) and the Cyber Centre to contain the breach and restore the integrity of its systems. Acting on a recommendation from the Cyber Centre, NSIRA has permanently decommissioned its Protected B network and related IT infrastructure. We also reported the matter to the RCMP, who are conducting a law enforcement investigation into the cyber incident.

NSIRA has also reported the privacy breach to the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada (OPC) and the Treasury Board Secretariat. We have worked closely with the OPC to assess the privacy implications of the breach and notify affected individuals. Under the Privacy Act, individuals are entitled to register a complaint with the OPC with respect to the treatment of their personal information. Further information about their complaints process, and access to the form, may be found online here.

NSIRA is committed to ensuring that its IT infrastructure reflects best-in-class IT security measures. We continue to collaborate with the Privy Council Office (PCO), the Communications Security Establishment (CSE) and SSC in this regard.

Useful Resources

We wish to emphasize that NSIRA has no evidence that any of the broader personal information referred to above was accessed or exfiltrated by the threat actor. We are cognizant of the risks that can arise from breaches of cyber security and recommend the resources below:

Both credit monitoring bureaus in Canada offer a selection of free and fee-based services:

Certain companies also offer services related to monitoring the Internet for the presence of an individual’s personal information, such as Telus’ Norton LifeLock.

In addition, the Government of Canada and the Office of the Privacy Commissioner have dedicated privacy and cybersecurity webpages, see:

For further information on the Microsoft Exchange vulnerability, see also:

To speak with NSIRA:

Please do not hesitate to contact us with questions or concerns at privacy-vieprivee@nsira-ossnr.gc.ca.

Updates, as applicable, will continue to be posted to NSIRA’s website.

We very much regret the impact of this cyber incident.

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Memorandum of Understanding Regarding Coordination of Activities

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Backgrounder

The National Security and Intelligence Review Agency (NSIRA) and the Office of the Privacy Commissioner (OPC) recognize the benefits of coordinating their efforts to ensure efficient and effective review. As such, NSIRA and the Office of the Privacy Commissioner (OPC) have implemented a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), setting out the parameters for future coordination between them.

NSIRA has the legal authority to coordinate its activities with those of the Privacy Commissioner under s.15.1 of the NSIRA Act, and to this end, may provide the Privacy Commissioner with information concerning its reviews. The Privacy Commissioner has the corresponding legal authority to coordinate his activities with those of NSIRA under s. 37(5) of the Privacy Act and may provide information to NSIRA pursuant to subsection 64(3) of the Privacy Act.

The MOU clearly defines the objectives and procedures for ongoing coordination, defines roles and responsibilities for joint reviews and investigations, and sets out the parameters for information management, reporting and administration. Implementing this MOU will enable NSIRA and the OPC to benefit from each other’s expertise and provide transparency on their coordination efforts.

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Press Release by the National Security and Intelligence Review Agency on Federal Court En banc matter

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The National Security and Intelligence Review Agency (NSIRA) has taken careful note of the decision of the Federal Court, issued on July 16, 2020, regarding the legality of certain Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS) activities involving human sources of intelligence and CSIS’s failure to meet its duty of candour owed to the Court.

The Federal Court examined the impact of CSIS’s application of the legal doctrine of Crown immunity to human source activities in the context of CSIS warrant applications. Until early 2019, CSIS relied on the doctrine of Crown immunity to justify a range of actions taken during the collection of intelligence by CSIS employees and those acting at their direction – actions that would normally be considered unlawful.

SIRC REVIEWS OF CSIS HUMAN SOURCE ACTIVITIES

In its decision, the Court cited the role of the Security Intelligence Review Committee (SIRC) in raising awareness of the issues regarding CSIS’s reliance on Crown immunity. SIRC, created alongside CSIS in 1984, closely scrutinized the activities of CSIS until its replacement by NSIRA in July 2019. During that time, SIRC regularly examined CSIS’s use of human sources to collect intelligence. For example:

  • In the May 12, 2015, review of CSIS’s Relationship and Exchanges with the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development (1) SIRC drew attention to the legal constraints facing CSIS with regard to its human source operations when it noted that certain CSIS operations abroad may have been in contravention of the United Nations Al Qaeda Taliban Regulations and other similar laws. SIRC then directed CSIS to undertake a wide-ranging review of its own activities for compliance.
  • In the May 27, 2016, review of CSIS’s Investigation of Canadian Foreign Fighters, (2) SIRC noted legal risks associated with certain CSIS operations, and recommended that “CSIS seek legal clarification on whether CSIS employees and CSIS human sources are afforded protection under the Common Law rule of Crown Immunity in regards to the terrorism-related offences of the Criminal Code of Canada.”

Bill C-59, An Act respecting national security matters, was introduced on June 20, 2017, received Royal assent on June 21, 2019, and is now in force. Included in Bill C-59 were new provisions that permit CSIS to undertake human source activities with explicit legal protection. These provisions were not retroactive, however.

SIRC continued to examine CSIS’s human source activities following the introduction of Bill C-59. In its annual report for 2016-2017, SIRC raised the issue of CSIS’s ongoing conduct of human source operations that risked contravening Canadian law. The report noted that, pending the coming-into-force of Bill C-59, SIRC would monitor CSIS’s efforts to mitigate the legal risks of human source operations.

SIRC’S CERTIFICATION OF THE CSIS DIRECTOR’S 2017-2018 REPORT

In its certification of the Director of CSIS’s 2017-2018 report to the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, SIRC concluded that, in its opinion, CSIS had conducted human source activities that could not be justified by the doctrine of Crown immunity. As such, CSIS had undertaken human source activities “despite knowing that these activities did not comply with the CSIS Act and Ministerial Direction, which stipulates that ‘the rule of law must be observed’”. SIRC also stated its expectation that the Director report these activities to the Minister and the Attorney General of Canada under section 20 of the CSIS Act. The SIRC certificate, dated March 21, 2019, was delivered to the Minister and the Director of CSIS.

NSIRA will discuss the SIRC certificate in its first annual report, coming this fall. Given the recent Federal Court decision, NSIRA has also published a redacted version of the certificate, available online here.

For more information on NSIRA and its mandate, please see our website.

The Federal Court decision notes how CSIS did not provide SIRC with important information (3). In addition, CSIS delayed informing SIRC of a key legal opinion regarding Crown immunity for almost two years until January 2019, at which time SIRC was briefed on the situation unfolding before the Federal Court. In the certificate, SIRC also noted that certain CSIS briefing notes and reports on this topic submitted to the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness had omitted key facts.

THE WAY FORWARD

Looking forward, the members of NSIRA believe strongly that CSIS’s utmost candour towards persons and institutions charged with reviewing and overseeing its activities is crucial to the effective functioning of Canada’s framework for national security accountability. This includes not only the Federal Court, but also review bodies such as NSIRA.

Independent review of CSIS is a statutory requirement for NSIRA. NSIRA reviews CSIS activities to ensure their compliance with the law and ministerial direction, as well as to ascertain the reasonableness and necessity of CSIS’s activities.

In its decision, the Federal Court recommends that a comprehensive external review be undertaken to fully identify the systemic, governance and cultural shortcomings and failures that resulted in CSIS engaging in illegal activity and the related breach of candour to the Court. The Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness and the Minister of Justice have since referred the matter to NSIRA for review under paragraph 8(1)(c) of the NSIRA Act.

In response, NSIRA will immediately launch a comprehensive review along the lines recommended by the Court. This review will focus primarily on CSIS and the Department of Justice. NSIRA may also review other related aspects of the matter as deemed appropriate, in accordance with our legal mandate. This review will be led jointly by two current members of NSIRA: the Honourable Marie Deschamps, C.C., a former justice of the Supreme Court of Canada, and Craig Forcese, a professor in the Faculty of Law at the University of Ottawa. NSIRA will expect full and unfettered access to all relevant information – as determined by NSIRA – needed to complete the review, as provided for in the NSIRA Act.

Contact

For more information, please contact:

Media Relations
NSIRA
media-medias@nsira-ossnr.gc.ca

Footnotes

(1) This review (2014-07) was subsequently published in the SIRC Annual Report 2014-2015.

(2) This review (2015-09) was subsequently published in the SIRC Annual Report 2015-2016.

(3) Please see paragraphs 56 and 126 of the Federal Court decision.

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NSIRA’s statement on a recent cyber incident

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News release

Ottawa Ontario, April 16, 2021  – On March 11th, 2021, unauthorized access was discovered on the National Security and Intelligence Review Agency’s (NSIRA) external network. This network houses unclassified and protected information only. It is not used for Secret or Top Secret information.

With the help of its federal partners, NSIRA was able to address this issue quickly and resume normal business operations.

NSIRA will be working with the Office of the Privacy Commissioner and Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat on any possible privacy issue. We will notify any affected individuals of updates directly or through our website. Ensuring the privacy of Canadians and the protection of NSIRA’s information are NSIRA’s top priority.

Contact

Tahera Mufti
Manager, Communications and Strategic Engagement
National Security and Intelligence Review Agency

media-medias@nsira-ossnr.gc.ca
www.nsira-ossnr.gc.ca

@NSIRACanada

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The Prime Minister announces appointment to the Secretariat of the National Security and Intelligence Review Agency

Public Statements

The Prime Minister announces appointment to the Secretariat of the National Security and Intelligence Review Agency


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The Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau, today announced the following appointment:

John Davies, currently Director General, National Security Policy Directorate, Public Safety Canada, becomes Executive Director, Secretariat of the National Security and Intelligence Review Agency, effective August 12, 2019.

Biographical notes

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